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Grilled Radicchio and Sorghum Pilaf

Grilled Radicchio and Sorghum Pilaf


Grilled Radicchio and Sorghum PilafThe deep maroon hues come from radicchio and dried cranberries, whose bitter and sweet flavors add depth. When toasted, sorghum takes on a rich malty taste; just be prepared that it takes a long simmer to get it tender. Don’t be alarmed if, while toasting the grains on the front end, a few pop—just fish them out and continue with the recipe.

Eating healthy should still be delicious.

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Hands-on time: 15 minutes Total time: 2 hours 4 minutes

Ingredients1 cup uncooked sorghum1 tablespoon butter1 1/2 cups chopped onion3 cups unsalted chicken stock (such as Swanson)2/3 cup water5/8 teaspoon kosher salt, divided1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper1/2 cup dried sweetened cranberries1 (12-ounce) head radicchio1 1/2tablespoons olive oil1/4 cup chopped walnuts, toasted

1. Heat a large saucepan over medium heat. Add sorghum; cook 4 minutes or until toasted, stirring occasionally. Remove from pan. Add butter to pan; swirl until butter melts. Add onion; cook 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add sorghum, stock, 2/3 cup water, 1/2 teaspoon salt, and pepper; bring to a boil. Cover, reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer 1 hour and 40 minutes or until grains are chewy-tender. (Liquid may not all be absorbed, but reserve this flavorful cooking liquid for another use such as soup broth.) Stir in cranberries; cover and keep warm.

2. Heat a large grill pan over high heat. Cut radicchio into quarters, leaving core intact. Brush all sides of radicchio with oil. Arrange radicchio in grill pan; grill 10 minutes, turning to brown on all sides. Remove from pan; coarsely chop, removing and discarding cores. Add radicchio to sorghum mixture; toss well to combine. Sprinkle with nuts.

SERVES 6 (serving size: about 1 cup)CALORIES 259; FAT 9.8g (sat 2.2g, mono 3.7g, poly 3.3g); PROTEIN 8g; CARB 39g; FIBER 4g; SUGARS 9g (est. added sugars 3g); CHOL 5mg; IRON 2mg; SODIUM 297mg; CALC 45mg

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What makes a good restaurant a “best”? The food? The service? The chef? The legacy? All of the above?

These 101 restaurants serve food that’s thoughtful and thought-provoking, and they also have a dining room and a level of service that suit the quality of what's on the plate, a good beverage list and a true sense of personality, imagination and consistency. Visiting one of these restaurants feels like a truly memorable culinary experience.


De los Condes

Based in Los Angeles, de los Condes offers full-service catering and event planning&mdash including floral arrangements, staffing and all event rentals&mdasharound the world. From cooking lessons to A-list client events, we do it all: dinner parties, baby showers, engagement parties, weddings, cocktail receptions, corporate events, tailgates, Bar-Mitzvahs and Bat-Mitzvahs, bachelor and bachelorette parties, and more!

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At the Heart of It All

Kenny Carrión

I first fell in love with food when I was seven years old. My early memories in the kitchen are of me sitting on a stool, in front of the stove, helping my mother cook delicious West Indian food and preparing rich Puerto Rican dishes with my father. As I followed my parents' traditions and recipes, my passion for food grew.

At the age of 15, eager to learn more, I took a job in one of New England's award-winning restaurants called Cavey's in Connecticut. It was working in Cavey's French dining room where I began to develop a true passion for wine, fine dining and classic French dishes.

At 19, I moved to Los Angeles to study fine art at Otis-Parsons. Here, I pursued my passion for design, and food became my medium. But, while Otis-Parsons provided me with a solid foundation, it's been my experiences around the world that have shaped my dishes for the past 25 years. I've been fortunate to have lived in and traveled to over 52 countries, and the people, culture and culinary customs of each country have inspired my cooking style and taste for beautiful aesthetics.

Whether I'm cooking for a small family or catering for hundreds of guests, my goal is always the same: create dishes where the presentation will draw them in and the flavors will keep them coming back for more.

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As part of our catering division, we offer an on-site organic juice bar. We celebrate unadulterated, exquisite flavors and the healing force of raw vegetables, fruits, herbs, and nuts. This bar consists of freshly made juices (from kale, spinach, beets, carrots, ginger, lemon, parsley, basil, celery, watercress, apple, watermelon, pineapple, and more), always in a delicious and nutritious ratio. We also craft juices that replace your typical sugar-filled cocktail mixers as a healthier alternative to make an amazingly delicious cocktail.

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Gluten-Free Meatloaf

Serve with mashed potatoes and a green vegetable.

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Preheat the oven to 400°F. Lightly coat a 9-inch loaf pan with cooking spray set aside.

In a large bowl, combine beef, cracker crumbs, chopped onion, carrots, egg, 1/4 cup of the tomato sauce, mustard, Worcestershire, salt and pepper. Transfer mixture to the prepared pan.

In a small bowl, combine remaining tomato sauce with the brown sugar. Pour over meatloaf and scatter sliced onion over the top.

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Recipe Index

I need 2 recipes for a gluten free 3 tier wedding cake, one that is chocolate and one just a white. I have 2 weddings for 2 family members, that have to have gluten free cakes. Could you please tell me how to adjust this recipe for chocolate and white. Thank you

You can adjust the lemon ginger wedding cake recipe to make chocolate and white cakes.
The basic recipe is here…

To make white cake, just leave out the lemon extract, grated lemon rind and ground ginger. You should add or increase the vanilla extract (almond extract might be nice too). Some sort of extract is important to mask the slight bean flavour from the garbanzo-fava flour.

I have never made this particular cake with chocolate but I am certain that you could add cocoa powder and some grated chocolate to the batter with excellent effect. Again, you will want to include vanilla an or almond extract. I would make a single batch (the top tier of the cake) as a test first.


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The Lost Art of Butchering: What Chef Wes Fulmer learned at “Cure Camp”

As a way to &ldquoget back to the basics&rdquo while advancing his craft, Motor Supply&rsquos Executive Chef Wes Fulmer took on the whole hog at a hands-on, three-day butchering and curing workshop in Charlotte, N.C. this spring.

&ldquoThe Lost Art of Butchering,&rdquo presented by Chef Luca Annunziata of Passion 8 bistro and led by French Master Butcher Marco Pauvert of the Four Seasons Hotel in Baltimore and Michael Sullivan, sales representative for Creekstone Farms Premium Beef LLC, demonstrated to 30 noted chefs the fundamentals of butchering focusing on the benefits of working with heritage breed animals and the fundamentals of butchering and using the whole protein, from nose to tail. The chefs got a fresh take on utilizing the best parts of the animal, making choice cuts of the freshest meats, while discovering how to make the most of each cut both on the plate and on the bottom line.

The intensive three-day workshop aimed to further extend the chef attendees&rsquo skills, who already use fresh, quality ingredients, routinely source locally and respect the whole animal but wish for additional perspective on practicing old school, whole-animal butchery.

&ldquoMaster Butcher Pauvert showed us a lot of techniques in the art of butchery that have been lost over the years,&rdquo said Chef Fulmer of his experience. &ldquoIt was cool, because you forget that those techniques are out there. When you see them, it confirms what you&rsquore doing right, and what you&rsquore doing wrong. You re-learn these things, and it gives you perspective and revitalizes you as a chef.&rdquo

Some of the whole-animal butchering included beef, pork and poultry (including chicken and duck) whole lamb and leg of veal.

The chefs then honed their crafting, seasoning and curing processes, practicing refining the art of patés and charcuterie via Paté de Campagne, boudin noir, varieties of sausage, duck galantine, confit legs, rendering duck fat, neck and wingettes confit, chicken cordon bleu, a l&rsquoescargots, veal Florentine, veal Milanese, veal roast Aosta and veal sausages.

Of Motor Supply&rsquos popular charcuterie program, Chef Fulmer said, &ldquoButchery and charcuterie go hand in hand &ndash it&rsquos humbling to see a master do it so skillfully. Now I know in which areas I can improve. I won&rsquot change our charcuterie program just perfect it. Now I can go beyond this level into the next stage of charcuterie making.&rdquo

About French Master Butcher Marco Pauvert

Pauvert began his apprenticeship at age 14 and became a master butcher at age 18. After a period of extensive traveling, Pauvert moved to the United States in 1986, settling in Philadelphia where he owned a succession of well-received butcher shops and gourmet shops. Butchering in France is not something that is taught in schools but as part of a long and arduous apprenticeship that culminates in a rigorous weeklong examination that begins, critically, with the selection of a live animal. In-house butchery operations such as the one Pauvert heads up at the Four Seasons are still not the rule in the industry, where most restaurants purchase meat that has already been broken down into subprimal cuts, an intermediate step between the larger primal cuts and individual portions. But the practice of working with large cuts and even whole animals is on the increase. Cutting along the seams of muscles, as opposed to the widespread industry practice of cutting through them, is the hallmark of seam butchery as well as the French-style butchery that Pauvert has brought to the Four Seasons. "It's the difference between meat-cutting and butchering," said Pauvert, who speaks of French butchery as an art.

About Chef Michael Sullivan

Anyone who knows Sullivan knows his lifelong passion for culinary arts and charcuterie. Known to his friends as Sully or the Reverend, Michael is a graduate of Culinary Institute of America and spent time at various chef positions before landing at Blackberry Farm as Butcher and Charcutier for ten years, where he could indulge his deep-rooted love of all things cured. While at Blackberry Farm, Sullivan began working at Cochon 555 and spent 5 years on the road with the tour, working with chefs and farmers across the country. In 2015, he embarked on a new adventure as a Regional Sales Manager with Creekstone Farms Premium Beef. Like an old fashioned circuit preacher, the Reverend Sully travels spreading the gospel of Black Angus Beef and pork.

About Passion 8 and Chef Luca Annunziata

At Passion 8, we love food. And food created with passion is the best way to celebrate this life. We are dedicated to creating an atmosphere that is both inviting and tranquil in which to dwell on what is really essential. Our devotion to exceptional quality from local producers is what we believe creates exquisite dishes and ultimately a better world. Our daily dinner menu offers an opportunity to consistently create dishes that are at peak freshness with a focus on showcasing the highest quality ingredients at any given time. Much of the produce we select is grown locally in keeping with our vision to emulate the great European tradition of hospitality- both on the plate and in the glass. Chef Luca Annunziata and his wife and partner Jessica have been a front runners in the Charlotte NC culinary community, helping to bring together the talent of area chefs and farmers. He is a founding member and on the board of the Piedmont Culinary Guild.

About the CPCC Culinary Arts Program

Chef Luca and the team at Passion 8 are happy to collaborate with the staff at Central Piedmont Community College in presenting this workshop.

About Motor Supply

Known for its artisan cocktails, refined yet relaxed atmosphere and daily-changing, chef-driven menu of sustainable, farm-to-table fare, Motor Supply Co. Bistro has been serving New World, made-from-scratch cuisine in the historic Columbia, S.C. Congaree Vista since 1989. A new, temperature-controlled outdoor patio features tables made from reclaimed, N.C. barn wood, roll-up garage doors and original, vintage brick. Reservations can be made by calling (803) 256-6687 or by visiting www.motorsupplycobistro.com.